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If you have any questions or comments regarding any of the material in the course, please post it here and I will answer it for you. If I don't have the answer, I will find it for you! If you have the question, then others who are working with the course probably have the same question, so this discussion will benefit everyone!

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In the first part of the essential rhythmn section, you suggested working in other keys, would C, G, D, A be the main four ( I, IV, V chord progression). Been working through, notice that the F chord is very similar to C when strumming chord rhtymn with alternating bass like Example 3. thanks, Joe
Joe,
Yes, it basically is the same, but one string over.
Dan
Went to my first fiddle jam and of course every thing was in 2/4 time but I figured out that the bass line and the strum could be considered one beat. Should have read the whole appendix 1, anyway I got to thinking, (dangerous) since I feel right comfortable in G fingerings for now, and yes I am practicing the other keys as well, as you say you don't always have a capo, however I have several and would like to know (question) How do you know which fret gives you what key? Is it like barr chords based on the 6th or 5th fret? If the 2 fret is the key of A capo on 2nd fret, is it the G and hence capo on the 3rd fret gives you A#/Bb? or is it like fractions in math, ya just gotta know the common denominator?

Thanks
OOPs, should have typed 5th or 6th string instead of fret and I read it several times and didn't see the moose-steak, until now.
OK, Thanks so much.
Take the shape move it up the scale, First shape or I should say chord progression denotes the key. Just have to remember or know where the half steps are.
7th Fret would get me into D using G shape. Probably sound like a banjo, could be fun

Thanks again.
Hey Dan:

Do you offer, or have you considered, a discounted price if someone were to want to buy all 8 volumes? I know all 8 have not been published but maybe some of us would be willing to pay upfront for the entire series...I know I would.

Thanks for a great learning tool!

Hal Loflin
Problem is, the half steps! Wouldn't capo on the 2nd fret give me a D in C fingering and not an E? Wouldn't the E be at the 4the fret? with the C fingering.
Opps! You are right. My carelessness. I need to relearn the alphabet! Here is a revised copy:

Using a Capo:

If you are playing a G chord shape and you put the capo on the first fret and play that same shape in the same relative position (with the capo now acting like the nut), you will then be playing a G# (or Ab) chord, if you put the capo on the second fret, you will be playing an A chord, if the capo is on the 3rd fret, you will be play a B flat (A#) chord, etc. Each subsequent fret moves the chord up one half step on the chromatic scale.

Since you are probably most familiar with playing the G position and the C position chords, here is a chart that may help you out.

For a G chord shape:

0 G
1 Ab/G#
2 A
3 Bb/A#
4 B
5 C
6 Db/C#
7 D


For a C chord shape:

0 C
1 Db/C#
2 D
3 Eb/D#
4 E
5 F
6 Gb/F#
7 G
I had the same problem with 15. Here is the discussion and some offered solutions - http://flatpick.ning.com/group/flatpickingessentials/forum/topics/f...

Cheers,
Curtis
You are right on Bruce!
Dan
Bruce,

You are right on! In my mind using the names, and chord shapes FDAA makes a lot more sense than CAGED. Also, in my mind the CAGED C shape and D shape are the same shape. That is why it is not used. However, I didn't invent this. As I mentioned in the book, I got the idea from a book that was written by Fred Sokolow.
What's that extremely bright light that just came on ?? ....Oh it's volume 4 !

Thanks allot Dan !....vol. 4 is almost like a 'get out of Jail FREE' card... :-)

Ty

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